Tuesday, September 20, 2011

JUSTIN MARTYR - JESUS ROLE IS ALWAYS ( QUALIFIED )!

Justin Martyr on the usual copy and paste biased Trinitarian Apologetic sites normally only quote the English translation of Justin and seldom include the original Greek for comparison. So the un-wary always take things on face value, which can be very misleading.

If you didn't do your own research when it comes to these hypothetical proof texts for the Tri{3}nity doctrine you might actually be suckered into believing what they say.

Justin Martyr when read carefully - always - ( qualifies ) - his statements about the Christ:

For example they often quote a clipped sentence telling you that Christ was called "...Lord of Hosts..." to support the idea that he is in fact "...Jehovah of Armies..." himself.

But lets take a closer look at a couple of these passages and see how Justin - ( qualifies ) - those statements:
 
LATIN TEXT: “...qui Dominus est virtutum per voluntatem Patris hoc ei dantis...” - (Page 395, Dialogus Cum Tryphone Judaeo. Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

GREEK TEXT: “...ὅς ἐστι κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων διὰ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ δόντος αὐτῷ πατρός, … κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων κατὰ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ πατρός, Ἰησοῦς Χριστός...” - (Chapter 85, Dialogue with Trypho, Edition. E. J. Goodspeed) Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1915.)

JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...who is the Lord of hosts, by the will of the Father who conferred on Him the dignity; … that He who rose from the dead, Jesus Christ, the Lord of hosts, according to the will of the Father,...” - (Chapter 85, Dialogue with Trypho, Translated by Alexander Roberts and James Donaldson.)
http://www.logoslibrary.org/justin/trypho/085.html

JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...who is Lord of hosts by the will of the Father who bestowed that honor upon Him; … that He who arose from the dead, Jesus Christ, the Lord of hosts, should enter in accordance with the Father's will...” - (Chapter 85, Dialogue with Trypho, Translated by Kevin Edgecome.)
http://www.bombaxo.com/trypho.html

I believe Justin is more accurately translated from the Greek this way:


GREEK TEXT: “...ὅς ἐστι κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων διὰ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ δόντος αὐτῷ πατρός, … κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων κατὰ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ πατρός, Ἰησοῦς Χριστός...” - (Chapter 85, Dialogue with Trypho, Edition. E. J. Goodspeed) Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1915.)

JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...Who is Lord of the Powers, by the permission granted to him through{*} the will of the Father … Lord of the Powers according to the will of the Father, Jesus Christ...” - (Chapter 85, Dialogue with Trypho, Translated by Matt13weedhacker 20/9/11.)

[FOOTNOTE *]: Gk., ( διὰ )

LATIN DEFINITION: “...[Ltn., ( dantis )] do , dĕdi, dătum, dăre (also in a longer form, dănunt = dant, … as, to give away, grant, concede, allow, permit; give up, yield, resign; bestow, present, confer, furnish, afford; offer, etc. (very freq.)...” - (A Latin Dictionary. Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. revised, enlarged, and in great part rewritten by. Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and. Charles Short, LL.D. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1879.)

GREEK DEFINITION: “...[Gk., ( δόντος )] [give, bestow, grant] … abs., of the laws, grant permission, “δόντων αὐτῷ τῶν νόμων” Is.7.2,...” - (Henry George Liddell. Robert Scott. A Greek-English Lexicon. revised and augmented throughout by. Sir Henry Stuart Jones. with the assistance of. Roderick McKenzie. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1940.)


Also compare:


LATIN TEXT: “...ut Christum demonstrem et Deum et Dominum virtutum et Jacob per similitudinem vocari a Spiritu sancto...” - (Page 327, Dialogus Cum Tryphone Judaeo. Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

GREEK TEXT: “...ὅτι καὶ θεὸς καὶ κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων ὁ Χριστὸς καὶ Ἰακὼβ καλεῖται ἐν παραβολῇ ὑπὸ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος...” - (Chapter 36, Dialogue with Trypho, Edition. E. J. Goodspeed) Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1915.)

 
JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...in order to prove that Christ is - ( called ) - both God and Lord of hosts, and Jacob, - ( in parable ) - by the Holy Spirit...” - (Chapter 36. He proves that Christ is called Lord of Hosts. Roberts & Donaldson ANF.)

JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...to show that the holy spirit - ( by parable calls ) - Christ God, and Lord of Hosts and of Jacob...” - (Chapter 36, Dialogue with Trypho, translated by Kevin Edgecome.)


Not that I think my translation is any great improvement, but here it is anyway:

GREEK TEXT: “...ὅτι καὶ θεὸς καὶ κύριος τῶν δυνάμεων ὁ Χριστὸς καὶ Ἰακὼβ καλεῖται ἐν παραβολῇ ὑπὸ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος...” - (Chapter 36, Dialogue with Trypho, Edition. E. J. Goodspeed) Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1915.)

JUSTIN MARTYR (circa. 110-160 C.E.): “...in order to show that the Christ is being called “a god” and also “Lord of the Powers” and “Jacob” - ( in parable ) - by{*} the spirit of holiness...” - (Chapter 36, Dialogue with Trypho, Translated by Matt13weedhacker 20/9/11 revised 25/9/11.)

[FOOTNOTE]: Gk., ( ὑπὸ )  

LATIN DEFINITION: “...I. In gen., likeness, resemblance, similitude...” - (A Latin Dictionary. Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. revised, enlarged, and in great part rewritten by. Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and. Charles Short, LL.D. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1879.)

GREEK DEFINITION: “...παραβολή 1 παραβάλλω 1. juxta-position, comparison, Plat. 2. a comparison, illustration, analogy, Arist. 3. a parable, i. e. a fictitious narrative by which some religious or moral lesson is conveyed, Ntest. 4. a by-word, proverb, id=NTest...” - (Liddell and Scott. An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1889.)

So this really it is not what it appears or claims to be upon closer investigation. 

NOTE: The Fathers will is always supreme and dominates over Christ.

NOTE: He is called these titles as the visible messenger and representative in the OT by "...the permission granted him..." by "...the Father..."

NOTE: He is called "...Lord of the Powers..." only symbolically or in parable.

NOTE: It is an anathrous Gk., ( θεὸς ) theos in this particular case.

This is just but one example which can be repeated again and again throughout Justins writings.