Friday, April 20, 2012

THE EFFECT OF THE EARLIEST THREE-IN-ONE CONCEPTS ON LATE SECOND EARLY THIRD CENTURY CHRISTIANITY = “...MAXIMUM CONFUSION THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD...”

Up-Dated with Wordsworth translation ( 27/04/12 )

What was the - ( effect ) - of the introduction of early proto-type or embryonic - ( concepts ) - of a three within one God, (of Father, Son, holy spirit), that eventually de-volved and mutated into the more fully developed Tri{3}nity doctrine in later centuries ; coming about as a direct over-reaction to these very heresies which were preached by such heretical apostates as Noetus, Sabellius, Praxaes etc, - on late Second and early Third Century Christianity?

Gk., ( μέγιστον τάραχον )
Ltn., ( maximam perturbationem )

LATIN TEXT: “...maximam perturbationem per totum mundum omnibus fidelibus iniicientes...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

GREEK TEXT: “...μέγιστον τάραχον κατὰ πάντα τὸν κόσμον ἐν πᾷσι τοῖς πιστοῖς ἐμβάλλοντες...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.):...We have performed a laborious work with regard to all (former) heresies, and have left none un-refuted ; but there remains now the hardest toil of all ; TO GIVE A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION AND REFUTATION OF THOSE HERESIES WHICH HAVE ARISEN IN OUR OWN AGE, BY MEANS OF WHICH SOME UN-LEARNED AND BOLD MEN HAVE UNDERTAKEN TO DISTRACT THE CHURCH, AND HAVE – ( PRODUCED VERY GREAT CONFUSION ) – THROUGH-OUT THE WORLD – ( AMONG ALL ) – THE FAITHFUL. For it appears requisite to re-vert to the dogma which was the primary source of the evil, and expose its origin, so that its offshoots may be manifest to all, and may be contemned...” - (Page 227, Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF HERESY,” in “ST. HIPPOLYTUS AND THE CHURCH OF ROME IN THE EARLIER PART OF THE THIRD CENTURY – From The Newly Discovered Philosophumena,” Translated by CHR. Wordsworth, 1853.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...A lengthened conflict, then, having been maintained concerning all heresies by us who, at all events, have not left any unrefuted, the greatest struggle now remains behind, viz., to furnish AN ACCOUNT AND REFUTATION OF THOSE HERESIES THAT HAVE SPRUNG UP IN OUR OWN DAY, BY WHICH CERTAIN IGNORANT AND PRESUMPTUOUS MEN HAVE ATTEMPTED TO SCATTER ABROAD THE CHURCH, AND HAVE INTRODUCED – ( THE GREATEST CONFUSION )[958]AMONG – ( ALL ) – THE FAITHFUL – ( THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD ). For it seems expedient that we, making an onslaught upon the opinion which constitutes the prime source of (contemporaneous) evils, should prove what are the originating principles[959] of this (opinion), in order that its offshoots, becoming a matter of general notoriety, may be made the object of universal scorn...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1. An Account of Contemporaneous Heresy. “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” Translated by J.H. MacMahon. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 5. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1886.)
[FOOTNOTE 958]: 1 Cor. xi. 19. These terrible confusions were thus foretold. Note the remarkable feeling, the impassioned tone, of the Apostle’s warning in Acts xx. 28–31.
[FOOTNOTE 959]: The Philosophumena, therefore, responds to the Apostle’s warnings. Col. ii. 8; 1 Tim. vi. 20; Gal. iv. 3, 9; Col. ii. 20.

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...A long fight has now been fought by us concerning all [early] heresies, and we have left nothing un-refuted. There still remains the greatest fight of all, [to wit] to thoroughly describe and refute the heresies risen up in our own day, by means whereof certain unlearned and daring men HAVE ATTEMPTED TO SCATTER THE CHURCH TO THE WINDS, [THEREBY] CASTING – ( THE GREATEST CONFUSION ) – AMONG THE FAITHFUL – ( THROUGHOUT THE WORLD ). For it seems fit that we should attack the opinion which was the first cause of [these] evils and expose its roots, so that its offshoots, being thoroughly known to all, may be contemned...” - (Page 117, Book IX, Chapter 6, “PHILOSOPHUMENA OR THE REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” Formerly Attributed To Origen, But Now To Hippolytus, Bishop And Martyr, Who Flourished About 220 A.D., Translated From The Text Of Cruice by F. Legge, F.S.A., LONDON, SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE, NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN CO. 1921.)
LATIN TEXT: “...maximam perturbationem per totum mundum omnibus fidelibus iniicientes...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...HAVE INCITED MAXIMUM CONFUSION THROUGHOUT ALL THE WORLD AMONG ALL THE FAITHFUL...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” According to the Latin Text by Matt13weedhacker 20/04/12.)

GREEK TEXT: “...μέγιστον τάραχον κατὰ πάντα τὸν κόσμον ἐν πᾷσι τοῖς πιστοῖς ἐμβάλλοντες...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...ARE THROWING ALL OF THE FAITHFUL INTO [THE] GREATEST CONFUSION [IMAGINABLE]{*} THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” According to the Greek Text by Matt13weedhacker 20/04/12.)
[FOOTNOTE *]: Gk., ( μέγιστον ) = a superlative of comparison.

Reference material:

ΤΑΡΑΧΉ 1
1. trouble, disorder, confusion, Pind., Thuc., etc.
2. of an army or fleet, Thuc., etc.; ἐν τῇ ταραχῇ in the confusion, Hdt.
3. political confusion, tumult, and in pl. tumults, troubles, id=Hdt., attic; τ. γίγνεται τῶν ξυμμάχων πρὸς τοὺς Λακεδαιμονίους Thuc.
Liddell and Scott. An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1889.

PERTURBĀTĬO , ōnis, f. perturbo,
I. confusion, disorder, disturbance.
I. Lit.: “caeli (opp. serenitas),” Cic. Div. 2, 45, 94: “hostium,” Vulg. 2 Macc. 13, 16.—
II. Trop.
A. In gen., political disturbance, disorder, revolution: “quid est enim aliud tumultus nisi perturbatio tanta, ut major timor oriatur?” Cic. Phil. 8, 1, 3: “quantas perturbationes et quantos aestus habet ratio comitiorum?” id. Mur. 17, 35: “cum enim omnes post interitum Caesaris novarum perturbationum causae quaeri viderentur,” id. Fat. 1, 2: “videtis, quo in motu temporum, quantā in conversione rerum ac perturbatione versemur,” id. Fl. 37, 94: “magna totius exercitūs perturbatio facta est,” Caes. B. G. 3, 28.—
B. Mental or personal disturbance, disquiet, perturbation: “motus atque perturbatio animorum atque rerum,” Cic. Agr. 1, 8, 24: “vitae et magna confusio,” id. N. D. 1, 2, 3: “rationis,” id. Par. 3, 2, 26: “valetudinis,” id. Fam. 9, 3, 9.—
C. In partic., an emotion, passion: quae Graeci πάθη vocant, nobis perturbationes appellari magis placet, quam morbos, Cic. Tusc. 4, 5, 10: “est igitur Zenonis haec definitio, ut perturbatio sit aversa a rectā ratione, contra naturam animi commotio: quidam brevius perturbationem esse appetitum vehementiorem,” id. ib. 4, 6, 11: “ex quā (vitiositate) concitantur perturbationes, quae sunt turbidi animorum concitatique motus, aversi a ratione et inimicissimi mentis vitaeque tranquillae,” id. ib. 4, 15, 34: “perturbationes sunt genere quatuor, partibus plures, aegritudo, formido, libido, laetitia,” id. Fin. 3, 10, 35: “impetu quodam animi et perturbatione magis, quam judicio aut consilio regi,” id. de Or. 2, 42, 178: “perturbationem afferre,” id. Div. 1, 30, 62: “in perturbationes atque exanimationes incidere,” id. Off. 1, 7, 36; “opp. to tranquillitas,” id. ib. 1, 17, 66.
A Latin Dictionary. Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. revised, enlarged, and in great part rewritten by. Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and. Charles Short, LL.D. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1879.

ΜΈΓΑΣ , μεγάλη [α^], μέγα^, gen. μεγάλου, ης, ου, dat. μεγάλῳ, ῃ, ῳ, acc. μέγα^ν, μεγάλην, μέγα^; dual μεγάλω, α, ω; pl. μεγάλοι, μεγάλαι, μεγάλα, etc.: the stem μεγάλο- is never used in sg. nom. and acc. masc. and neut., and only once in voc. masc.,
C. degrees of Comparison (regul. μεγαλώτερος, -ώτατος late, EM780.1,2): [...]
2. Sup. μέγιστος, η, ον, Il.2.412, etc.: neut. as Adv., “μέγιστον ἴσχυσε” S.Aj.502; δυνάμενος μ., c. gen., Hdt.7.5, 9.9: with another Sup., “μέγιστον ἐχθίστη” E.Med.1323: in pl., “χαῖρ᾽ ὡς μέγιστα” S.Ph.462; “θάλλει μ.” Id.OC700 (lyr.); “τὰ μέγιστ᾽ ἐτιμάθης” Id.OT1203 (lyr.); ἐς μέγιστον ib.521; “ἐς τὰ μ.” Hdt.8.111:—late Sup. “μεγιστότατος” PLond.1.130.49 (i/ii A. D.). (Cf. Skt. majmán- 'greatness', Lat. magnus, Goth. mikils 'great'.)
Henry George Liddell. Robert Scott. A Greek-English Lexicon. revised and augmented throughout by. Sir Henry Stuart Jones. with the assistance of. Roderick McKenzie. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1940.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

FEAR & THE TRI{3}NITY


JAMES R. WHITE: “...[The Trinity] is the topic we don't want to talk about: no one dares question the Trinity for fear of being branded a “heretic,” yet we have all sorts of questions about it, and we aren't sure who we can ask...” - (Page 14, The Forgotten Trinity.)

Could this historical fact be part of the reason for such “...FEAR...”

LATIN TEXT: “...IN NOMINE DOMINI NOSTRI IHESU CHRISTI,( CODICIS ) DOMINI NOSTRI ( IUSTINIANI ) SACRATISSIMI PRINCIPIS REPETITAE PRAELECTIONIS – LIBER PRIMUS. Ii. DE SUMMA TRINITATE ET DE FIDE CATHOLICA ET UT NEMO DE EA PUBLICE CONTENDERE AUDEAT...” - (Page 5, 1.1.1, CORPUS IURIS CIVILIS – Editio Stereotypa Quinta, Volumen Secundum, CODEX IUSTINIANUS Recognovitt Paulus Krueger 1892.)  

THEODOSIUS II (circa. 345-399 C.E.): “...In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. Book I of the revised edition of the Code of our Lord and sacred Emperor Justinian. CONCERNING THE HIGH TRINITY OF THE CATHOLIC FAITH, AND THAT NO ONE --- ( SHALL DARE TO ) --- DESPUTE --- ABOUT IT PUBLICLY...” - (Annotated Justinian Code by Fred H. Blume edited by Timothy Kearly, Second Edition, 2010.)


Note the phrase: 

“...THAT NO ONE --- ( SHALL DARE TO ) --- DESPUTE ABOUT IT PUBLICLY...”

Compare it with James White: 

“...NO ONE - ( DARES ) - QUESTION THE TRINITY FOR FEAR...”

LATIN TEXT: “...Impp. Theodosius et Valentinianus AA. Hormisdae pp. Sancimus ut quaecumque Porphyrius insainia sua compulsus sive alius quilibet contra religiosum Christianorum cultum conscripserit, apud quemcumque inventa fuerint, igni tradantur. Omnia enim scripta, quae deum as iracundian provocunt animasque offendunt, ne ad auditium quidem hominum venire volumus. Praeterea sancimus, ut qui impiam Nestori fidem adfecant vel nefariam eius doctrinam sequuntur, si episcopi vel clerici sint, sanctis ecclesiis eiciantur, sin laici, anathematizentur : data licentia orthodoxis, qui volunt et piam legislationem nostram sequuntur, absque metu et damo eos denuntiandi et accusandi. Cum autem ad pias aures nostras pervenerit a quibusdam conscriptas et editas esse doctrinas ambiguas neque accurate congruentes cum orthodoxa fide proposita a sancto concilio patrum sanctorum, qui Nicaeae et Ephesi convenerunt, et a Cyrillo piae memoriae, Alexandrinae magnae civitatis quondam episcopo, iubemus tales libros sive antea sive hoc tempore scriptos, imprimis Nestori, comburi et perfecto exitio tradi, ut ne in cognitionem quidem cuiusquam veniant : his, qui tales scripturas aut libros habere et legere continuaverint, ultimum supplicium subituris. Ceterum nulli licere praeter fidem, ut diximus, Nicaeae atque Ephesi expositam profiteri quicquam vel docere...” - (Page 5-6, CORPUS IURIS CIVILIS – Editio Stereotypa Quinta, Volumen Secundum, CODEX IUSTINIANUS Recognovitt Paulus Krueger 1892.)

THEODOSIUS II (circa. 345-399 C.E.): “...Emperors [1.1.1.] Theodosius and Valentinian to Horisda, Praetorian Prefect.[1.] We decree that […] [1.1.3.] Since it has, moreover, come to our pious ears, that ( some persons ) have written and pulbished - ( ambiguous doctrines ), - which are – ( not ) – in absolute agreement with the orthodox faith laid down by the holy council of the holy fathers who assembled at Nicea and Ephesus, […] - ( PERSONS ) - WHO CONTINUE TO -- ( HAVE AND READ ) -- SUCH – ( WRITINGS OR BOOKS ) -- SHALL BE – ( PUNISHED BY DEATH ). Besides, no one shall be permitted as we have said, to acknowledge or teach any creed, except the one laid down at Nicea and Ephesus. Given at Constatinople February 16 (448)...” - (Codex Justinianus 1.1.1-3; Annotated Justinian Code by Fred H. Blume edited by Timothy Kearly, Second Edition, 2010.)

Yes because it was punishable “...BY DEATH...”

It was this, along with the Satan inspired Inquisitions, that installed this “...FEAR...” so much so, that it still affects the thinking of Tri{3}nitarians to this very day.

1ST JOHN 5:20(B)


VINCENT'S WORD STUDIES by Marvin R. Vincent, 1886.
An understanding (διάνοιαν)
Only here in John's writings. The faculty of understanding. See on Luke 1:51. Westcott remarks that nouns which express intellectual powers are rare in the writings of John.
We may know (γινώσκομεν)
Apprehend progressively. Compare John 17:3.
Him that is true (τὸν ἀληθινόν)
Compare Revelation 3:7, Revelation 3:14; Revelation 6:10. On true, see on John 1:9. "God very strangely condescends indeed in making things plain to me, actually assuming for the time the form of a man, that I at my poor level may better see Him. This is my opportunity to know Him. This incarnation is God making Himself accessible to human thought - God opening to man the possibility of correspondence through Jesus Christ. And this correspondence and this environment are those I seek. He Himself assures me, 'This is life eternal, that they might know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom Thou hast sent.' Do I not now discern the deeper meaning in Jesus Christ whom Thou hast sent? Do I not better understand with what vision and rapture the profoundest of the disciples exclaims, 'The Son of God is come, and hath given us an understanding, that we might know Him that is true?'" (Drummond, "Natural Law in the Spiritual World").
This
God the Father. Many, however, refer it to the Son.
Eternal life
See on 1 John 1:2.

1ST JOHN 5:20(A)


THE EPISTLES OF ST JOHN By Brooke Foss Westcott, D.D., D.C.L. Lord Bishop of Durham Canon of Peterborough and Westminster Regius Professor of Divinity, Cambridge, Third Edition 1892.
1 John 5:20. The third affirmation of knowledge is introduced by the adversative particle (oi[d. dev). There is, this seems to be the line of thought, a startling antithesis in life of good and evil. We have been made to feel it in all its intensity. But at the same time we can face it in faith. That which is as yet dark will be made light. There is given to us the power of ever-advancing knowledge and of present divine fellowship. We can wait even as God waits. The particle dev is comparatively unfrequent in St John’s writings: 1 John 1:7; 2:2, 5, 11, 17; 3:12, 17; 4:18; 3 John 14.
h{kei, kai; devdwken] hath come and hath given. Faith rests on the permanence of the fact and not upon the historic fact only. Comp. John 8:42 note.
devdwken] 1 John 3:1, 4:13. Contrast 3:23, 24; 5:11 (e[dwken) note.
diavnoian] sensum V., understanding. This is the only place in which the term occurs in St John’s writings; and generally nouns which express intellectual powers are rare in them. Thus St John never uses gnw'si", nor is nou'" found in his Gospel or Epistles. Diavnoia, as compared with nou'", represents the process of rational thought. Comp. Eph. 4:18 ejn mataiovthti tou' noo;" aujtw'n, ejskotwmevnoi th'/ dianoiva/ o[nte" (the first principles of the Gentiles were unsubstantial, and they had lost the power of right reasoning). Exclusive of quotations from the LXX, diavnoia is found: 1 Pet. 1:13 ajnazwsavmenoi ta;" ojsfuva" th'" dianoiva"; 2 Pet. 3:1 diegeivrw th;n eijlikrinh' diavnoian; and, in a more concrete sense, Luke 1:51 dianoiva/ kardiva"; Col. 1:21 ejcqrou;" th'/ dianoiva/; Eph. 2:3 ta; qelhvmata th'" sarko;" kai; tw'n dianoiw'n.
That with which ‘the Son of God’ Incarnate has endowed believers is a power of understanding, of interpreting, of following out to their right issues, the complex facts of life; and the end of the gift is that they may know, not by one decisive act ( i{na gnw'sin
) but by a continuous and progressive apprehension (i{na ginw'skwsi), ‘Him that is true.’ Thus the object of knowledge is not abstract but personal: not the Truth, but Him of Whom all that is true is a partial revelation.
It is evident that the fact of the Incarnation (uiJo;" tou' q. h{kei) vitally welcomed carries with it the power of believing in and seeing little by little the divine purpose of life under the perplexing riddles of phenomena.
The language in which Ignatius describes this gift is remarkable: dia; tiv ouj pavnte" frovnimoi ginovmeqa labovnte" qeou' gnw'sin, o{ ejstin jIhsou'" Cristov"… tiv mwrw'" ajpolluvmeqa ajgnoou'nte" to; cavrisma o} pevpomfen ajlhqw'" oJ Kuvrio"; (ad Eph. xvii.).
i{na ginwvskomen] This clause finds a remarkable commentary in John 17:3. Eternal life is the never-ending effort after this knowledge of God. Compare John 10:38, i{na gnw'te kai; ginwvskhte o{ti ejn ejmoi; oJ path;r kajgw; ejn aujtw'/.
It seems likely that ginwvskomen is to be regarded as a corrupt pronunciation of ginwvskwmen. It is remarkable that in John 17:3 many authorities read ginwvskousin for -wsin. Comp. Winer, iii. § 41. 1.
to;n ajlhqinovn] verum Deum V., quod est verum F. (i.e. to; ajl.), Him that is true, Who in contrast with all imaginary and imperfect objects of worship completely satisfies the idea of Godhead in the mind of man, even the Father revealed in and by the Son (John 1:18, 14:9). Christ is also called oJ ajlhqinov", Apoc. 3:7; compare also Apoc. 3:14 (6:10). For ajlhqinov" see John 1:9, 4:23, 15:1 notes. Comp. 1 Thess. 1:9 qeo;" zw'n kai; ajlhqinov".
kaiv ejsmen... jI. Cr.] et simus (as depending on ut) in vero filio eius V. St John adds a comment on what he has just said. Christians are not only enabled to gain a knowledge of God: they are already in fellowship with Him, ‘in Him.’ We are in Him that is true, even in His Son, Jesus Christ. The latter clause defines and confirms the reality of the divine fellowship. So far as Christians are united with Christ, they are united with God. His assumption of humanity (Jesus Christ) explains how the union is possible.
ou|tov" ejstin...] As far as the grammatical construction of the sentence is concerned the pronoun (ou|to") may refer either to ‘Him that is true’ or to ‘Jesus Christ.’ The most natural reference however is to the subject not locally nearest but dominant in the mind of the apostle (comp. 1 John 2:22; 2 John 7; Acts 4:11; 7:19). This is obviously ‘He that is true’ further described by the addition of ‘His Son.’ Thus the pronoun gathers up the revelation indicated in the words which precede (comp. John 1:2 note): This Being—this One who is true, who is revealed through and in His Son, with whom we are united by His Son—is the true God and life eternal. In other words the revelation of God as Father in Christ (comp. 1 John 2:22 f.) satisfies, and can alone satisfy, the need of man. To know God as Father is eternal life (John 17:3) and so Christ has revealed Him (1 John 1:2).
oJ ajlhq. q.] Comp. Is. 65:16 (LXX). Compare the famous words of Ignatius: ei|" qeov" ejsti oJ fanerwvsa" eJauto;n dia; jIhsou' Cristou' tou' uiJou' aujtou', o{" ejstin aujtou' lovgo" aji?dio", ajpo; sigh'" proelqwvn, o}" kata; pavnta eujhrevsthsen tw'/ pevmyanti aujtovn (ad Magn. viii.). Aristides is said to have maintained before Hadrian ‘quod Christus Jesus solus (al. verus) esset Deus’ (Mart. Rom. ap. Routh Rell. Sacrr. 1.80). This statement may be regarded as a summary paraphrase of the Greek text: ginwvskousi to;n qeo;n ktivsthn kai; dhmiourgo;n tw'n aJpavntwn ejn uiJw'/ monogenei' kai; pneuvmati aJgivw/ kai; a[llon qeo;n plh;n touvtou ou| sevbontai (c. xv.). The Syriac text has no reference to the Son and the Holy Spirit. Yet see Harnack, Text. u. Untersuch. 1.114.
ou|to"...zwh; aijwvn.] The phrase is not exactly parallel with those which describe (as far as we can apprehend it) the essential nature of God (John 4:24, 1 John 1:5, 4:8). See Additional Note on 1 John 4:8. It expresses His relation to men, and so far is parallel with Heb. 12:29 (Deut. 4:24).
On ‘Eternal life’ see Additional Note.