Friday, April 20, 2012

THE EFFECT OF THE EARLIEST THREE-IN-ONE CONCEPTS ON LATE SECOND EARLY THIRD CENTURY CHRISTIANITY = “...MAXIMUM CONFUSION THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD...”

Up-Dated with Wordsworth translation ( 27/04/12 )

What was the - ( effect ) - of the introduction of early proto-type or embryonic - ( concepts ) - of a three within one God, (of Father, Son, holy spirit), that eventually de-volved and mutated into the more fully developed Tri{3}nity doctrine in later centuries ; coming about as a direct over-reaction to these very heresies which were preached by such heretical apostates as Noetus, Sabellius, Praxaes etc, - on late Second and early Third Century Christianity?

Gk., ( μέγιστον τάραχον )
Ltn., ( maximam perturbationem )

LATIN TEXT: “...maximam perturbationem per totum mundum omnibus fidelibus iniicientes...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

GREEK TEXT: “...μέγιστον τάραχον κατὰ πάντα τὸν κόσμον ἐν πᾷσι τοῖς πιστοῖς ἐμβάλλοντες...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.):...We have performed a laborious work with regard to all (former) heresies, and have left none un-refuted ; but there remains now the hardest toil of all ; TO GIVE A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION AND REFUTATION OF THOSE HERESIES WHICH HAVE ARISEN IN OUR OWN AGE, BY MEANS OF WHICH SOME UN-LEARNED AND BOLD MEN HAVE UNDERTAKEN TO DISTRACT THE CHURCH, AND HAVE – ( PRODUCED VERY GREAT CONFUSION ) – THROUGH-OUT THE WORLD – ( AMONG ALL ) – THE FAITHFUL. For it appears requisite to re-vert to the dogma which was the primary source of the evil, and expose its origin, so that its offshoots may be manifest to all, and may be contemned...” - (Page 227, Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF HERESY,” in “ST. HIPPOLYTUS AND THE CHURCH OF ROME IN THE EARLIER PART OF THE THIRD CENTURY – From The Newly Discovered Philosophumena,” Translated by CHR. Wordsworth, 1853.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...A lengthened conflict, then, having been maintained concerning all heresies by us who, at all events, have not left any unrefuted, the greatest struggle now remains behind, viz., to furnish AN ACCOUNT AND REFUTATION OF THOSE HERESIES THAT HAVE SPRUNG UP IN OUR OWN DAY, BY WHICH CERTAIN IGNORANT AND PRESUMPTUOUS MEN HAVE ATTEMPTED TO SCATTER ABROAD THE CHURCH, AND HAVE INTRODUCED – ( THE GREATEST CONFUSION )[958]AMONG – ( ALL ) – THE FAITHFUL – ( THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD ). For it seems expedient that we, making an onslaught upon the opinion which constitutes the prime source of (contemporaneous) evils, should prove what are the originating principles[959] of this (opinion), in order that its offshoots, becoming a matter of general notoriety, may be made the object of universal scorn...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1. An Account of Contemporaneous Heresy. “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” Translated by J.H. MacMahon. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 5. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1886.)
[FOOTNOTE 958]: 1 Cor. xi. 19. These terrible confusions were thus foretold. Note the remarkable feeling, the impassioned tone, of the Apostle’s warning in Acts xx. 28–31.
[FOOTNOTE 959]: The Philosophumena, therefore, responds to the Apostle’s warnings. Col. ii. 8; 1 Tim. vi. 20; Gal. iv. 3, 9; Col. ii. 20.

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...A long fight has now been fought by us concerning all [early] heresies, and we have left nothing un-refuted. There still remains the greatest fight of all, [to wit] to thoroughly describe and refute the heresies risen up in our own day, by means whereof certain unlearned and daring men HAVE ATTEMPTED TO SCATTER THE CHURCH TO THE WINDS, [THEREBY] CASTING – ( THE GREATEST CONFUSION ) – AMONG THE FAITHFUL – ( THROUGHOUT THE WORLD ). For it seems fit that we should attack the opinion which was the first cause of [these] evils and expose its roots, so that its offshoots, being thoroughly known to all, may be contemned...” - (Page 117, Book IX, Chapter 6, “PHILOSOPHUMENA OR THE REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” Formerly Attributed To Origen, But Now To Hippolytus, Bishop And Martyr, Who Flourished About 220 A.D., Translated From The Text Of Cruice by F. Legge, F.S.A., LONDON, SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE, NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN CO. 1921.)
LATIN TEXT: “...maximam perturbationem per totum mundum omnibus fidelibus iniicientes...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...HAVE INCITED MAXIMUM CONFUSION THROUGHOUT ALL THE WORLD AMONG ALL THE FAITHFUL...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” According to the Latin Text by Matt13weedhacker 20/04/12.)

GREEK TEXT: “...μέγιστον τάραχον κατὰ πάντα τὸν κόσμον ἐν πᾷσι τοῖς πιστοῖς ἐμβάλλοντες...” - (Pages 440-441, Book IX, Chapter 1, “S. HIPPOLYTI EPISCOPI ET MARTYRIS, REFUTATIONIS OMNIUM HAERESIUM,” LIBRORUM DECEM QUAE SUPERSUNT. RECENSURERUNT, LATINAE VERTERUNT, NOTAS ADIECERUNT, LUD. DUNCKER et F. G. SHNEIDEWIN, GOTTINGAE, SUMPTIBUS DIETERICHIANIS 1859.)

HIPPOLYTUS OF ROME (circa. 170-236 C.E.): “...ARE THROWING ALL OF THE FAITHFUL INTO [THE] GREATEST CONFUSION [IMAGINABLE]{*} THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WORLD...” - (Book IX, Chapter 1, “REFUTATION OF ALL HERESIES,” According to the Greek Text by Matt13weedhacker 20/04/12.)
[FOOTNOTE *]: Gk., ( μέγιστον ) = a superlative of comparison.

Reference material:

ΤΑΡΑΧΉ 1
1. trouble, disorder, confusion, Pind., Thuc., etc.
2. of an army or fleet, Thuc., etc.; ἐν τῇ ταραχῇ in the confusion, Hdt.
3. political confusion, tumult, and in pl. tumults, troubles, id=Hdt., attic; τ. γίγνεται τῶν ξυμμάχων πρὸς τοὺς Λακεδαιμονίους Thuc.
Liddell and Scott. An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1889.

PERTURBĀTĬO , ōnis, f. perturbo,
I. confusion, disorder, disturbance.
I. Lit.: “caeli (opp. serenitas),” Cic. Div. 2, 45, 94: “hostium,” Vulg. 2 Macc. 13, 16.—
II. Trop.
A. In gen., political disturbance, disorder, revolution: “quid est enim aliud tumultus nisi perturbatio tanta, ut major timor oriatur?” Cic. Phil. 8, 1, 3: “quantas perturbationes et quantos aestus habet ratio comitiorum?” id. Mur. 17, 35: “cum enim omnes post interitum Caesaris novarum perturbationum causae quaeri viderentur,” id. Fat. 1, 2: “videtis, quo in motu temporum, quantā in conversione rerum ac perturbatione versemur,” id. Fl. 37, 94: “magna totius exercitūs perturbatio facta est,” Caes. B. G. 3, 28.—
B. Mental or personal disturbance, disquiet, perturbation: “motus atque perturbatio animorum atque rerum,” Cic. Agr. 1, 8, 24: “vitae et magna confusio,” id. N. D. 1, 2, 3: “rationis,” id. Par. 3, 2, 26: “valetudinis,” id. Fam. 9, 3, 9.—
C. In partic., an emotion, passion: quae Graeci πάθη vocant, nobis perturbationes appellari magis placet, quam morbos, Cic. Tusc. 4, 5, 10: “est igitur Zenonis haec definitio, ut perturbatio sit aversa a rectā ratione, contra naturam animi commotio: quidam brevius perturbationem esse appetitum vehementiorem,” id. ib. 4, 6, 11: “ex quā (vitiositate) concitantur perturbationes, quae sunt turbidi animorum concitatique motus, aversi a ratione et inimicissimi mentis vitaeque tranquillae,” id. ib. 4, 15, 34: “perturbationes sunt genere quatuor, partibus plures, aegritudo, formido, libido, laetitia,” id. Fin. 3, 10, 35: “impetu quodam animi et perturbatione magis, quam judicio aut consilio regi,” id. de Or. 2, 42, 178: “perturbationem afferre,” id. Div. 1, 30, 62: “in perturbationes atque exanimationes incidere,” id. Off. 1, 7, 36; “opp. to tranquillitas,” id. ib. 1, 17, 66.
A Latin Dictionary. Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary. revised, enlarged, and in great part rewritten by. Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and. Charles Short, LL.D. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1879.

ΜΈΓΑΣ , μεγάλη [α^], μέγα^, gen. μεγάλου, ης, ου, dat. μεγάλῳ, ῃ, ῳ, acc. μέγα^ν, μεγάλην, μέγα^; dual μεγάλω, α, ω; pl. μεγάλοι, μεγάλαι, μεγάλα, etc.: the stem μεγάλο- is never used in sg. nom. and acc. masc. and neut., and only once in voc. masc.,
C. degrees of Comparison (regul. μεγαλώτερος, -ώτατος late, EM780.1,2): [...]
2. Sup. μέγιστος, η, ον, Il.2.412, etc.: neut. as Adv., “μέγιστον ἴσχυσε” S.Aj.502; δυνάμενος μ., c. gen., Hdt.7.5, 9.9: with another Sup., “μέγιστον ἐχθίστη” E.Med.1323: in pl., “χαῖρ᾽ ὡς μέγιστα” S.Ph.462; “θάλλει μ.” Id.OC700 (lyr.); “τὰ μέγιστ᾽ ἐτιμάθης” Id.OT1203 (lyr.); ἐς μέγιστον ib.521; “ἐς τὰ μ.” Hdt.8.111:—late Sup. “μεγιστότατος” PLond.1.130.49 (i/ii A. D.). (Cf. Skt. majmán- 'greatness', Lat. magnus, Goth. mikils 'great'.)
Henry George Liddell. Robert Scott. A Greek-English Lexicon. revised and augmented throughout by. Sir Henry Stuart Jones. with the assistance of. Roderick McKenzie. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1940.