Friday, July 27, 2012

ROMANS 14:9 --- A QUESTION FOR TRI{3}NITARIANS! THE OBVIOUS MEANING & OBVIOUS IMPLICATIONS!


What is meant by the following phrase in Romans 14:9?

What are the ( obvious ) implications of this phrase?

ΠΡΟΣ ΡΩΜΑΙΟΥΣ 14:9 Greek NT: Westcott/Hort, UBS4 variants
“...εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ Χριστὸς ἀπέθανεν καὶ ἔζησεν, ἵνα καὶ νεκρῶν καὶ ζώντων κυριεύσῃ...”

ΠΡΟΣ ΡΩΜΑΙΟΥΣ 14:9 Westcott/Hort, UBS4 variants - Transliterated
“...EIS TOUTO GAR CHRISTOS APETHANEN KAI EZESEN HINA KAI NEKRON KAI ZONTON KURIEUSE...”

International Standard Version (©2008)
“...so that he might become...”
New International Version (©1984)
“...so that he might be...”
English Standard Version (©2001)
“...that he might be...”
New American Standard Bible (©1995)
“...that He might be...”
King James Bible (Cambridge Ed.)
“...that he might be...”
Aramaic Bible in Plain English (©2010)
“...that he would be...”
GOD'S WORD® Translation (©1995)
“...so that he would be...”
King James 2000 Bible (©2003)
“...that he might be...”
American King James Version
“...that he might be...”
American Standard Version
“...that he might be...”
Douay-Rheims Bible
“...that he might be...”
Darby Bible Translation
“...that he might rule over...”
English Revised Version
“...that he might be...”
Webster's Bible Translation
“...that he might be...”
Weymouth New Testament
“...namely that He might be...”
World English Bible
“...that he might be...”
Young's Literal Translation
“...that ... he may be...”

Analytical Literal-Translation:
...so that He should...”

Benjiman Wilson's Emphatic Diaglott:
...so that ... he might be...”

Concordant Literal Version:
...that He should be...”

The Amplified Bible:
...that he might be...”

Jonathan Mitchell NT:
...to the end that He may (should) be...”

Kenneth Wuest's Expanded New Testament:
...in order that He might...”

Holy Bible A Conservative Version:
...so that he might be...”

American Bible Union NT 1865:
...that he might be...”

An Understandable Version 1994:
...so that He could be...”

The Accurate NT 1st Version:
...that … [He] may rule...”

Contemporary English Version:
...so that he would be...”

Common English NT 1999:
...that he might be...”

Complete Apostles' Bible:
...so that He might be...”

Coptic NT Northern Dialect in English:
...that he might be lord...”

Coptic NT Southern Dialect in English:
...that he should become...”

The Emphasised Bible:
...in order that … he might have...”

E. W. Bullinger Companion Bible:
...in order that He might be...”

English Majority Text Version:
... so that He might be...”

Etheridge NT 1849:
...that he might be...”

Exegesis Ready Research Bible:
...that he might be...”

Noyes NT 1869:
...that he might be...”

Good News Bible:
...in order to be...”

Goodspeed NT:
...for the very purpose of being...”

Israeli Authorised Version:
...that he might be...”

James Moffatt NT:
...to be...”

Greens Literal Translation:
...that He might be...”

Worsley NT 1770:
...that He might be...”

Holy Bible by Julia Smith:
...that he might...”

King James Version:
...that he might be...”

Lamsa Aramaic NT:
...and rose to be...”

Literal Translation of the Holy Bible:
...that He might be...”

Living Oracles NT 1835:
...that he might...”

Messianic Renewed Covenant Version:
...that He might have...”

Montgomery NT:
...that he might be...”

James Murdock NT:
...that he might be...”

New Simplified Bible:
...that he might be...”

Orthodox Jewish Bible:
...in order that he might have...”

Revised James Murdock NT:
...that he might be...”

The Riverside NT:
...in order that he might be...”

Sawyer NT:
...that he might...”

Knox NT:
...he would be...”

Twentieth Century NT 1904:
...that he might be...”

Updated Bible Version:
...that he might be...”

Wesley's NT 1755:
...that he might be...”

World English Bible Red Letter Version:
...that he might be...”

Hebrew Names Version:
...that he might be...”

Gk., ( κυριεύω ) = “...verb - aorist active subjunctive - third person singular ( kurieuo ko-ree-yoo'-o ): to rule -- have dominion over, lord, be lord of, exercise lordship over...”

SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD: “...In grammar, the subjunctive mood (abbreviated sjv or sbjv) is a verb mood typically used in subordinate clauses to express various states of unreality such as wish, emotion, possibility, judgment, opinion, necessity, or action that has not yet occurred...”

...Might be Lord Gk., ( κυριεύση ) Lit., might Lord it over...” - (“WORD STUDIES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT,” By Marvin Richardson Vincent, First published 1886-1887, Reprinted 1972.)

ROBERTSON'S WORD PICTURES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
...Might be lord of Gk., ( κυριευσει kurieusei ). Ingressive aorist active subjunctive of Gk., ( κυριευω kurieuō ) “become Lord of.” Purpose clause with Gk., ( ινα hina ) “that”. Old verb from Gk., ( κυριος kurios ) “lord.” See note on Luke 22:25 and Romans 6:9...” - (Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 14:9" The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.)

What does it mean when it says he:

1.) “...MIGHT...”

And what does it mean when it says he might:

2.) “...BECOME...” or “...HAVE...”

Lorship etc?

What is the meaning?

And what are the ( obvious doctrinal implications ) of that statement?

I ask all sincere truth seekers and Tri{3}nitarians to -- please think about?

NOTE: The Tri{3}nitarian commentators above all go on in their commentaries to assume a Tri{3}nitarian interpretation in spite of the obvious implications of the subjunctive Gk., ( kurieuse ). I am in no way trying to represent them as Non-Tri{3}nitarian in belief.

Thursday, July 26, 2012

COLOSSIANS 1:18 --- A QUESTION FOR TRI{3}NITARIANS - THE OBVIOUS MEANING & OBVIOUS IMPLICATIONS!


What is meant by the following phrase in Colossians 1:18?

What are the ( obvious ) implications of this phrase?

...καὶ αὐτός ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῦ σώματος τῆς ἐκκλησίας· ὅς ἐστιν {VAR1 [ἡ] } ἀρχή, πρωτότοκος ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, ἵνα γένηται ἐν πᾶσιν αὐτὸς πρωτεύων...”

...KAI AUTOS ESTIN E KEPHALE TOU SOMATOS TES EKKLESIAS OS ESTIN {WH: [E]} ARCHE PROTOTOKOS EK TON NEKRON HINA GENETAI EN PASIN AUTOS PROTEUON...”

New International Version (©1984)
...so that ... he might have...”
English Standard Version (©2001)
...that ... he might be...”
New American Standard Bible (©1995)
...so that He Himself will come to have...”
King James Bible (Cambridge Ed.)
...that … he might have...”
International Standard Version (©2008)
...so that he himself might have...”
Aramaic Bible in Plain English (©2010)
...that he would be...”
GOD'S WORD® Translation (©1995)
...so that he would have...”
King James 2000 Bible (©2003)
...that ... he might have...
American King James Version
...that ... he might have...”
American Standard Version
...that ... he might have...”
Douay-Rheims Bible
...that ... he may...”
Darby Bible Translation
...that he might have...”
English Revised Version
...he might have...”
Webster's Bible Translation
...that ... he may have...”
Weymouth New Testament
...in order that He Himself may...”
World English Bible
...he might have...”
...that he might become...”

The Berkley NT Version:
...so that ... He might have...”

The Amplified Bible:
...so that He ... might occupy...”

Kenneth Wuest's Expanded New Testament:
...in order that He might become...”

The Emphasized Bible:
...in order that he might become...”

Benjimon Wilson's Emphatic Diaglott:
...so that he might become...”

Holy Bible A Conservative Version:
...so that he might become...”

American Bible Union NT 1865:
...that he may become...”

An Understandable Version 1994:
...so that He could...”

Analytical Literal-Translation:
...so that He shall be...”

Contemporary English Version:
...so that he would be...”

Common English NT 1999:
...so that he might have...”

Complete Apostles' Bible:
...He may have...”

Concordant Literal Version:
(CLV) “...He may be becoming...”

E. W. Bullinger Companion Bible:
...He might become...”

English Majority Text Version:
...He may have...”

Etheridge NT 1849:
...that he should be...”

Exegesis Ready Research Bible:
...he might have...”

Noyes NT 1869: 
...that he may be...”

Good News Bible:
...might have...”

Goodspeed NT:
...that he might come to...”

Israeli Authorized Version:
...he might have...”

International Standard Version:
...so that he himself might have...”

James Moffatt NT:
...in virtue of ... that gives him...”

Greens Literal Translation:
...that He be...”

Jonathan Mitchell NT:
...to the end that He may be birthed (come into existence; come to be)...”

Worsley NT 1770:
...He might have...”

Holy Bible by Julia Smith:
...that he might be...”

King James Version:
...he might have...”

Lamsa Aramaic NT:
...he might be...”

Literal Translation of the Holy Bible:
...that He be...”

Living Oracles NT 1835:
...he might be...”

Messianic Renewed Covenant Version:
...so that He Himself might come to have...”

Montgomery NT:
...he may become...”

James Murdock NT:
...that he might be...”

New Simplified Bible:
...he might have...”

Orthodox Jewish Bible:
...might be...”

Revised James Murdock NT:
...that he might be...”

The Riverside NT:
...that he may be...”

Sawyer NT:
...that he might himself be...”

Knox NT:
...was to become his...”

Twentieth Century NT 1904:
...that he ... may...”

Updated Bible Version:
...he might have...”

Wesley's NT 1755:
...he might have...”

World English Bible Red Letter Version:
...he might have...”

Hebrew Names Version:
...he might have...”

The Accurate NT 1st Version:
...that may become...”

Gk., ( ἵνα ) = conjunction ( hina hin'-ah ): in order that (denoting the purpose or the result) -- albeit, because, to the intent (that), lest, so as, (so) that, (for) to.

Gk., ( γένηται ) = verb - second aorist middle deponent subjunctive - third person singular ( ginomai ghin'-om-ahee ): to cause to be, gen-erate, i.e. reflexively, to become, come into being, used with great latitude (literal, figurative, intensive, etc.)

...[STRONGS]: 2443 Gk., ( hína ) a subordinating conjunction – for the purpose that (in order that), looking to the aim (intended result) of the verbal idea. 2443 Gk., ( hína ) "for the purpose that" is "the semantically marked (dramatic) way of expressing purpose in Greek (as compared for example to the plain infinitive)" (G. Archer)...” - (
Copyright © 1987, 2011 by Helps Ministries, Inc.)

SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD: “...In grammar, the subjunctive mood (abbreviated sjv or sbjv) is a verb mood typically used in subordinate clauses to express various states of unreality such as wish, emotion, possibility, judgment, opinion, necessity, or action that has not yet occurred...”

...He might have the pre-eminence - Greek, "might be first" - πρωτεύων prōteuōn. That is, might be first in rank, dignity, honor, power...”

...Might have the preeminence (γένηται πρωτεύων) Lit., might become being first. Πρωτεύω to be first only here in the New Testament. Γένηται become states a relation into which Christ came in the course of time...” - (“WORD STUDIES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT,” By Marvin Richardson Vincent, First published 1886-1887, Reprinted 1972.)

ROBERTSON'S WORD PICTURES OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
...Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the second aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai “that he himself in all things (material and spiritual) may come to (γενηται — genētai not ηι — ēi be) hold the first place...” - (Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Colossians 1:18". The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright, Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960.)

WUEST'S WORD STUDIES
...Might have the preeminence" is Gk., ( genētai prōteuōn ), "might become being first; Gk., ( prōteuō ) to be first only here in the N.T. Gk., ( genētai ) "become" states a new relation into which Christ came in the course of time...” - (WUEST'S WORD STUDIES, Volume One, by Kenneth S. Wuest, Publisher: William B. Eerdmans 1979.)

THE NEW LINGUISTIC AND EXEGETICAL KEY TO THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT
...gevnhtai aor. subj. mid. (dep.) givnomai (G1181) to become, to be. The purp. cl. means, “that He Himself in all things (material and spiritual) may come to hold the first place” (RWP)...” - (The New Linguistic and Exegetical Key to The Greek New Testament
Cleon L. Rogers Jr. & Cleon L. Rogers III, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, A Division of Harper Collins Publishers 1998.)

JOHN EADIE NEW TESTAMENT COMMENTARY
...The verb gevnhtai is not to be confounded with the verb of simple existence. The meaning is not that He might be, but that “He might become.” Acts 10:4; Rom. 3:19; Heb. 5:12. The verb in such cases denotes the manifestation of result...” - (THE EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL TO THE COLOSSIANS Based on the Greek Text By John Eadie, D.D., LL.D. Edited By Rev. W. Young, M.A., Glasgow 1870's.)

What does it mean when it says he:

1.) “...MIGHT...”

And what does it mean when it says he might:

2.) “...BECOME...”

First?

What is the meaning?

And what are the ( obvious doctrinal implications ) of that statement? 

I ask all sincere truth seekers and Tri{3}nitarians to -- please think about?

NOTE: The Tri{3}nitarian commentators above all go on in their commentaries to assume a Tri{3}nitarian interpretation in spite of the obvious implications of the subjunctive Gk., ( genetai ). I am in no way trying to represent them as Non-Tri{3}nitarian in belief.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

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Sunday, July 8, 2012

( PART 15 ) DID THE EARLIEST POST-BIBLICAL CHRISTIAN WRITERS TEACH CHRISTENDOM'S OFFICIAL DOCTRINE OF THE TRI{3}NITY? = CLEMENT OF ROME – LETTER TO THE CORINTHIANS – CHAPTER 7



ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α
...1ST CLEMENT TOWARD [THE] CORINTHIANS...”

ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’
...CHAPTER 7...”


GREEK TEXT: “...Ταῦτα, ἀγαπητοί, οὐ μόνον ὑμᾶς νουθετοῦντες ἐπιστέλλομεν, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἑαυτοὺς ὑπομιμνήσκοντες· ἐν γὰρ τῷ αὐτῷ ἐσμὲν σκάμματι, καὶ ὁ αὐτὸς ἡμῖν ἀγὼν ἐπίκειται. ∆ιὸ ἀπολίπωμεν τὰς κενὰς καὶ ματαίας φροντίδας καὶ ἔλθωμεν ἐπὶ τὸν εὐκλεῆ καὶ σεμνὸν τῆς παραδόσεως ἡμῶν κανόνα καὶ ἴδωμεν, τί καλὸν καὶ τί τερπνὸν καὶ τί προσδεκτὸν ἐνώπιον τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς. Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ, ὅτι διὰ τὴν ἡμετέραν σωτηρίαν ἐκχυθὲν παντὶ τῷ κόσμῳ μετανοίας χάριν ἐπήνεγκεν. ∆ιέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας καὶ καταμάθωμεν, ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ' αὐτόν. Νῶε ἐκήρυξεν μετάνοιαν καὶ οἱ ὑπακούσαντες ἐσώθησαν. Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - ([Chapter 7:1-7] ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ταῦτα, [1.] ἀγαπητοί, οὐ μόνον ὑμᾶς νουθετοῦντες ἐπιστέλλομεν, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἑαυτοὺς ὑπομιμνήσκοντες· ἐν γὰρ τῷ αὐτῷ ἐσμὲν σκάμματι, καὶ ὁ αὐτὸς ἡμῖν ἀγὼν ἐπίκειται. [2.] διὸ ἀπολίπωμεν τὰς κενὰς καὶ ματαίας φροντίδας, καὶ ἔλθωμεν ἐπὶ τὸν εὐκλεῆ καὶ σεμνὸν τῆς παραδόσεως ἡμῶν κανόνα, [3.] καὶ ἐνώπιον τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς. [4.] ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ, ὅτι διὰ τὴν ἡμετέραν σωτηρίαν ἐκχυθὲν παντὶ τῷ κόσμῳ μετανοίας χάριν ὑήνεγκεν. [5.] διέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας, καὶ καταμάθωμεν ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ’ αὐτόν. [6.] Νῶε ἐκήρυξεν μετάνοιαν, καὶ οἱ ὑπακούσαντες ἐσώθησαν. [7.] Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καιπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter ,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ταῦτα, [1.] ἀγαπητοί, οὐ μόνον ὑμᾶς νουθετοῦντες ἐπιστέλλομεν, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἑαυτοὺς ὑπομιμνήσκοντες· ἐν γὰρ τῷ αὐτῷ ἐσμὲν σκάμματι, καὶ ὁ αὐτὸς ἡμῖν ἀγὼν ἐπίκειται. [2.] Διὸ ἀπολίπωμεν τὰς κενὰς καὶ ματαίας φροντίδας καὶ ἔλθωμεν ἐπὶ τὸν εὐκλεῆ καὶ σεμνὸν τῆς παραδόσεως ἡμῶν κανόνα [3.] καὶ ἴδωμεν, τί καλὸν καὶ τί τερπνὸν καὶ τί προσδεκτὸν ἐνώπιον τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς. [4.] Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ, ὅτι διὰ τὴν ἡμετέραν σωτηρίαν ἐκχυθὲν παντὶ τῷ κόσμῳ μετανοίας χάριν ἐπήνεγκεν. [5.] Διέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας καὶ καταμάθωμεν, ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ’ αὐτόν. [6.] Νῶε ἐκήρυξεν μετάνοιαν καὶ οἱ ὑπακούσαντες ἐσώθησαν. [7.] Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter , “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” Clemens Romanus (Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους) Epistula i ad Corinthios, ed. A. Jaubert, Clément de Rome. Épìtre aux Corinthiens // Sources chrétiennes 167. Paris: Cerf, 1971, 98–204.)

LATIN TEXT: “...[Ἀτενίσ]ωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, [καὶ ἷδ]ῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ [αἷμα] αὐτοῦ...” - (Page 223-224, Chapter 7:4, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's “Patrologia Graeca,” or “Patrologiae Cursus Completus,” Series Graeca, Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866 .)

GREEK TEXT: “...[Ἀτενίσ]ωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, [καὶ ἷδ]ῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ [καὶ Πατρ]ὶ{*} αὐτοῦ...” - (Pages 54-55; Chapter 7:4; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS Translated by J.B. Lightfoot.)
[TEXTUAL FOOTNOTE 5]: Gk.,( καὶ Πατρὶ ) See below. Gk.,( Πατρὶ ) Bleek (in Dressel). An upright stroke, probaly Gk., ( Ὶ ), and a portion of the preceding letter, which might be Gk.,( Π ), are visible in the MS. Thus Young's reading Gk., ( αἷμα ), which is followed by most editors, cannot stand.
[FOOTNOTE *]: Gk., ( καὶ Πατρὶ ) I have read Gk., ( καὶ Πατρὶ ) rather than Gk., ( Πατρὶ ) alone for two reasons ; [ 1 ] If Gk., ( Πατρὶ ) were contracted Gk.,( ΠΡῚ ) as is most usual in the MS, the letters would not be sufficient to fill the space ; [ 2 ] We find Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ ) frequently in the Apostolic writings followed by Gk., ( τοῦ Κυρίου ), etc. (E.g. Rom. XV. 6, 2nd Cor. I. 3, etc., 1st Pet. I. 3, Rev. I. 6), whereas Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς Πατὴρ ) is never found. In fact with any genitive following, the alternative seems to be Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ ) or Gk., ( Θεὸς Πατὴρ ). On the other hand Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς Πατὴρ ) occurs once only in the N.T. (Col. III. 17, with a v.l.), and there it is used absolutely.

GREEK TEXT: ...Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, καὶ γνῶμεν ὡς ἔστι τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter , CLEMENTIS ROMANI EPISTULAE, Edidit. Commentario Critico et Adnotationibus Instruxit, by Adolphus Hilgenfeld 1876.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, καὶ γνῶμεν ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Page , Chapter ; PATRES APOSTOLICI, by Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Haec, carissimi mihi, non solum uos monentes scribimus, sed et nos metipos conmonemus : in eodum enim scemate sumus, et eundem certamen nobis imminet. Itaque relinquamus uanas curas, et ueniamus quod est bonum et suaue et acceptabile coram Deo qui fecit nos. Intueamur in sanquine Christi, et cognoscamus quam preclarum sit Patri eius, quod propter nostram salutem effusus omni orbi terrarum penitentiam intulit.Ueniamus ad omina secula, et consideremus quia in secula poenitenciae dedit locum Dominus uolentibus conuerti ad eum. Noe predicauit poenitentiam, et qui obaudierunt salui facti sunt. Ionas Niniuitis predicauit euersionem ; et quia poenitentiam egerunt propter peccata sua, exorauerunt Deum deprecantes, et acceperunt salutem, quamuis erant alieni Deo...” - (Chapter , Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Haec, dilecti, non tantum ut vos admoneamus, scribimus ; sed etiam ut nos ipsi commonefaciamus : in eodem enim stadio versamur, et certamen idem nobis impositum est. Quocirca relinquamus inanes et vanas curas, atque veniamus ad gloriosam et venerabilem sanctae vocationis nostrae regulam. Videamus quid bonum, et quid jucundum acceptumque coram eo qui fecit nos. Fixis oculis respiciamus in sanguinem Christi, cernamusque quam pretiosus Deo sit ejus sanguis, qui propter nostram salutem effusus, toti mundo poenitentiae gratiam obtulit. Intueamur diligenter omnes mundi aetates, discamusque quod in singulis aetatibus, poenitentiae locum Dominus dedit volentibus ad ipsam [ipsum] converti. Noe poenitentiam praedicavit ; et qui ei obedierunt, sevati sunt. Jonas Ninivitis urbis subversionem praedicavit ; illi autem de peccatis suis acta poenitentia, Deum precibus placarunt, et salutem conecuti sunt, licet alieni a Deo essent...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Animum intendamus in sanguinem Christi cernamusque quam pretiosus Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (Page 223-224, Chapter 7:4, Latin translation [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866 .)

LATIN TEXT: “...Sanguinem Christi intentis oculis intueamur et cognoscamus, quam pretiosus sit Deo et Patri eios...” - (Page 109, Chapter 7:4; Latin translation PATRES APOSTOLICI, by Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)


A COMPARISON OF TRANSLATIONS OLD AND NEW


CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And well pleasing in the sight of Him that made us. Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious his blood is in the sight of God […] and learn from age to age the LORD hath given place for repentance […] appeased the wrath of God by their prayers ; and received salvation although they were strangers (to the covenant) of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” by Temple Chevallier, edited by W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...These [1.] things, dearly beloved, we write, not only as admonishing you, but also as putting ourselves in remembrance. For we are in the same lists, and the same contest awaiteth us. [2.] Wherefore let us forsake idle and vain thoughts; and let us conform to the glorious and venerable rule which hath been handed down to us; [3.] and let us see what is good and what is pleasant and what is acceptable in the sight of Him that made us. [4.] Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is unto His Father, because being shed for our salvation it won for the whole world the grace of repentance. [5.] Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn how from generation to generation the Master hath given a place for repentance
unto them that desire to turn to Him. [6.] Noah preached repentance, and they that obeyed were saved. [7.] Jonah preached destruction unto the men of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, obtained pardon of God by their supplications and received salvation, albeit they were aliens from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” By George A. Jackson. The Apostolic fathers ; and, The Fathers of the third century. 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...These [1.] things we enjoin you, beloved, not only by way of admonition to you, but as putting ourselves also in mind. For we are in the same arena, and the same contest is imposed upon us. [2.] Wherefore, let us leave empty and vain thoughts, and come unto the glorious and venerable rule of our holy calling. [3.] Let us consider what is good and pleasing and acceptable before him who made us. [4.] Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious in the sight of God is his blood, which having been poured out for our salvation, brought to the whole world the grace of repentance. [5.] Let us go back to all generations, and learn that in every generation God hath granted a place for repentance to such as wished to return unto him. [6.] Noah preached repentance, and as many as hearkened unto him were saved. [7.] Jonah prophesied destruction to the Ninevites, and they, repenting of their sins, appeased God through prayer, and, though alien from God, obtained salvation...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS translated by Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us consider what is good, and acceptable, and well pleasing in the sifht of Him that made us. Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious His blood is in the sight of God […] and let us learn that our Lordf has in every one of them still given place for repentance […] howbeit they, repenting of their sins, appeased God by their prayers, and were saved, though they were strangers to the covenant of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, Ancient & Modern Library of Theological Literature by Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...These [1.] things, dearly beloved, we write, not only as admonishing you, but also as putting ourselves in remembrance. For we are in the same lists, and the same contest awaiteth us. [2.] Wherefore let us forsake idle and vain thoughts; and let us conform to the glorious and venerable rule which hath been handed down to us; [3.] and let us see what is good and what is pleasant and what is acceptable in the sight of Him that made us. [4.] Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is unto His Father, because being shed for our salvation it won for the whole world the grace of repentance. [5.] Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn how from generation to generation the Master hath given a place for repentance
unto them that desire to turn to Him. [6.] Noah preached repentance, and they that obeyed were saved. [7.] Jonah preached destruction unto the men of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, obtained pardon of God by their supplications and received salvation, albeit they were aliens from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS Translated by J.B. Lightfoot, 1890.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...These things, beloved, we write to you, not merely to admonish you of your duty, but also to remind ourselves. For we are struggling in the same arena, and the same conflict is assigned to both of us. So let us give up vain and fruitless cares, and approach to the glorious and venerable rule of our holy calling. Let us attend to what is good, pleasing, and acceptable in the sight of Him who formed us. Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious that blood is to God, which, having been shed for our salvation, has set the grace of repentance before the whole world. Let us turn to every age that has passed, and learn that, from generation to generation, the Lord has granted a place of repentance to all who would be converted to Him. Noah preached repentance, and as many as listened to him were saved. Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites; but they, repenting of their sins, propitiated God by prayer, and obtained salvation, although they were aliens [to the covenant] of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “The First Epistle Of Clement To The Corinthians,” Translated by John Keith. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 9. Edited by Allan Menzies. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1896.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...And let us see what is good and pleasing and acceptable in the sight of our Maker. Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ, and let us know that it is precious to his Father […] and let us learn that in generation after generation the master has given a place of repentance […] they received forgiveness of their sins from God in answer to prayer, and gained salvation, though they were aliens to God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and let us see what is comely and pleasant and acceptable in the sight of our Maker. Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ, and let us learn how precious it is unto his Father […] and observe how in each successive generation the Master has given a place for repentance […] and they repented of their sins, and propitiated God with their supplications and were saved, aliens though they were from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...We are writing this, beloved, not merely for your admonition, but also to serve as a reminder to ourselves; for we are in the same arena and face the same conflict. Let us, then, give up those empty and futile aspirations, and turn to the glorious and venerable rule of our tradition. Let us attend to what is noble, what is pleasing, what is acceptable in the sight of our Maker. Let us fix our gaze upon the Blood of Christ and understand how precious it is to the Father, because, poured out for our salvation, it brought to the whole world the grace of conversion. Let us pass in review all the generations and learn the lesson, that from generation to generation the Master has given an opportunity for conversion to those who were willing to turn to Him. Noe preached the need of conversion, and such as heeded him were saved. Jonas announced destruction to the Ninevites: they did penance for their sins and by their prayers propitiated God and gained salvation, although they were not of God’s own people...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” THE EPISTLES OF. ST. CLEMENT OF ROME AND ST. IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH NEWLY TRANSLATED AND ANNOTATED BY JAMES A. KLEIST, S.J., Ph.D. Professor of Classical Languages St. Louis University St. Louis, Mo. THE NEWMAN BOOKSHOP WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us see what is good and pleasing and acceptable in the sight of our Maker. Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ and realize how precious it is to his Father […] and learn that from generation to generation the Lord has given an opportunity of repentance […] and they repented of their sins, besought God in prayer and, estranged though they were from God, obtained salvation...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE FATHERS OF THE CHURCH, A New Translation Vol. 1, Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
http://www.scribd.com/doc/53598582/The-Fathers-of-the-Church-A-new-translation-Volume-01

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Beloved, [1.] we write not only admonishing you, but also reminding ourselves, for we are in the same arena and the same contest is imposed on us. [2.] Therefore, let us leave behind the empty and worthless concerns, and approach the renowned and honorable rule (canon) of our tradition. [3.] And let us look to what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is acceptable before our Maker. [4.] Let us look to the blood of Christ, which is precious to His Father, which, having been poured out for our salvation, has made available to the whole world the abundance of repentance.
[5.] Let us go through every generation and observe that, from generation to generation,
the Master has granted a place of repentance to those who would turn to Him.
[6.] Noah preached repentance, and those who listened were saved. [7.] Jonah preached destruction to the Ninevites, but they, having repented of their sins, appeased God by supplication, and received salvation, even though they were foreigners to God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...We [1.] write these things, dear friends, not only to admonish you, but also to remind ourselves. For we are in the same arena, and the same contest awaits us. [2.] Therefore let us abandon empty and futile thoughts, and let us conform to the glorious and holy rule of our tradition; [3.] indeed, let us note what is good and what is pleasing and what is acceptable in the sight of him who made us. [4.] Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is to his Father, because, being poured out for our salvation, it won for the whole world the grace of repentance. [5.] Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn that from generation to generation the Master has given an opportunity for repentance to those who desire to turn to him. [6.] Noah preached repentance, and those who obeyed were saved. [7.] Jonah preached destruction to the people of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, made atonement to God by their prayers and received salvation, even though they were alienated from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Michael Holmes 3rd edition 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...We should realize what is good and pleasing and acceptable before the One who made us. We should gaze intently on the blood of Christ and realize how precious it is to his Father […] Let us review all the generations and learn that from one to the next the Master has provided opportunity for repentance […] and those who repented of their sins appeased God through their fervent pleas and received salvation, even though they had been estranged from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers: I Clement, II Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Didache,” By Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=7nPPmqAu4RwC&printsec=frontcover&dq=the+apostolic+fathers&hl=en&ei=cN9ATZHDD4L3gAecmZjfAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false&safe=high

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us note what is good, what is pleasing and acceptable to Him who made us. Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and let us realize how precious it is to his Father […] that from one generation to another the Master “has afforded opportunity of repentance” […] and when they had repented of their sins, they propitiated God with their prayers and gained salvation despite the fact they were not God's people...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers, the Moody Classics 2009.)


TEXTUAL VARIANTS


DOCTRINAL EXAMINATION


CHAPTER 7:2-3:


GREEK TEXT: “...καὶ ἔλθωμεν ἐπὶ τὸν εὐκλεῆ καὶ σεμνὸν τῆς παραδόσεως ἡμῶν κανόνα, [3.] καὶ ἐνώπιον τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...καὶ ἴδωμεν, τί καλὸν καὶ τί τερπνὸν καὶ τί προσδεκτὸν ἐνώπιον τοῦ ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” Clemens Romanus (Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους) Epistula i ad Corinthios, ed. A. Jaubert, Clément de Rome. Épìtre aux Corinthiens // Sources chrétiennes 167. Paris: Cerf, 1971, 98–204.)

GREEK TEXT: “...ἴδωμεν, τί καλὸν καὶ τί τερπνὸν καὶ τί προσδεκτὸν ἐνώπιον τοῦ ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

LATIN TEXT: “...et ueniamus quod est bonum et suaue et acceptabile coram Deo qui fecit nos...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3,, Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Videamus quid bonum, et quid jucundum acceptumque coram eo qui fecit nos....” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

Below I have provided my own translations of some of the texts with alternative renderings for some of them.

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And well pleasing in the sight of Him that made us...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and let us see what is good and what is pleasant and what is acceptable in the sight of Him that made us...” - (George A. Jackson 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us consider what is good and pleasing and acceptable before him who made us...” - (Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us consider what is good, and acceptable, and well pleasing in the sifht of Him that made us...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and let us see what is good and what is pleasant and what is acceptable in the sight of Him that made us...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us attend to what is good, pleasing, and acceptable in the sight of Him who formed us...” - (John Keith 1896.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...And let us see what is good and pleasing and acceptable in the sight of our Maker...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and let us see what is comely and pleasant and acceptable in the sight of our Maker...” - (An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us attend to what is noble, what is pleasing, what is acceptable in the sight of our Maker...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us see what is good and pleasing and acceptable in the sight of our Maker...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...And let us look to what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is acceptable before our Maker...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...indeed, let us note what is good and what is pleasing and what is acceptable in the sight of him who made us...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...We should realize what is good and pleasing and acceptable before the One who made us...” - (By Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us note what is good, what is pleasing and acceptable to Him who made us...” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)

Matt13weedhacker translations:

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And that we should approach that well reported and grand rule handed down to us, even in the sight of Him that made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Lake text, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And let us approach that happy report and majestic tradtion that has been handed down to us, even in the sight of the One Who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Lake Text, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...even that we should be observing what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is welcomely received in the sight of the One that made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, MPG Text, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...even that we should be observing what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is acceptible in the sight of the One Who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, MPG Text, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...even that we should be observing what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is acceptible in the sight of Him Who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, MPG Text, Rendering C, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...even that we should be observing what is good, and what is pleasing, and what is acceptible in the sight of our Maker...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, MPG Text, Rendering D, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Even that we should come to what is good and pleasent and acceptable before the eyes of God himself, who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Morin Ltn, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And we should be coming to [the realization of] what is good and pleasing and worthy of acceptance before the eyes of God himself, who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Morin Ltn, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...And we should be coming to [realize] what is good and pleasing and worthy of acceptance before the eyes of God, [even] He who made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Morin Ltn, Rendering C, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...[That] we should be discerning what is good, and what is pleasing, [and] therefore has been accepted before the eyes of the One who has made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...[That] we should percieve what is good, and what is pleasing, [and] as a result has been accepted before the eyes of Him who has made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...[That] we should percieve what is good, and what is pleasing, [and] therefore acceptible in the presence of Him who has made us...” - (Chapter 7:2(B)-3, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering C, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

Lets focus in a little further on the important phrase used by Clement.

GREEK TEXT: “...τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - (Krissop Lake 1913.)
GREEK TEXT: “...τοῦ ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - (Sources chrétiennes 1971.)
GREEK TEXT: “...τοῦ ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
LATIN TEXT: “...Deo qui fecit nos...” - (G. Morin 1894.)
LATIN TEXT: “...eo qui fecit nos....” - (EX VERSIONE RUFINI)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...of Him that made us...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...of Him that made us...” - (George A. Jackson. 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...him who made us...” - (Charles H. Hoole 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...of Him that made us...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...of Him that made us...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...of Him that made us...” - (Roberts & Donaldson.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...our Maker...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...our Maker...” - (An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...our Maker...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...our Maker...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...our Maker...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...of him who made us...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...the One who made us....” - (Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...to Him who made us....” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)


CHAPTER 7:4


GREEK TEXT: “...ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4, ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...[Ἀτενίσ]ωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, [καὶ ἷδ]ῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ [αἷμα] αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's “Patrologia Graeca,” or “Patrologiae Cursus Completus,” Series Graeca, Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...[Ἀτενίσ]ωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, [καὶ ἷδ]ῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ [καὶ Πατρ]ὶ{*} αὐτοῦ...” - (Pages 54-55; Chapter 7:4; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS Translated by J.B. Lightfoot.)
[TEXTUAL FOOTNOTE 5]: Gk.,( καὶ Πατρὶ ) See below. Gk.,( Πατρὶ ) Bleek (in Dressel). An upright stroke, probaly Gk., ( Ὶ ), and a portion of the preceding letter, which might be Gk.,( Π ), are visible in the MS. Thus Young's reading Gk., ( αἷμα ), which is followed by most editors, cannot stand.
[FOOTNOTE *]: Gk., ( καὶ Πατρὶ ) I have read Gk., ( καὶ Πατρὶ ) rather than Gk., ( Πατρὶ ) alone for two reasons ; [ 1 ] If Gk., ( Πατρὶ ) were contracted Gk.,( ΠΡῚ ) as is most usual in the MS, the letters would not be sufficient to fill the space ; [ 2 ] We find Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ ) frequently in the Apostolic writings followed by Gk., ( τοῦ Κυρίου ), etc. (E.g. Rom. XV. 6, 2nd Cor. I. 3, etc., 1st Pet. I. 3, Rev. I. 6), whereas Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς Πατὴρ ) is never found. In fact with any genitive following, the alternative seems to be Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ ) or Gk., ( Θεὸς Πατὴρ ). On the other hand Gk., ( ὸ Θεὸς Πατὴρ ) occurs once only in the N.T. (Col. III. 17, with a v.l.), and there it is used absolutely.

GREEK TEXT: ...Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, καὶ γνῶμεν ὡς ἔστι τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4, CLEMENTIS ROMANI EPISTULAE, Edidit. Commentario Critico et Adnotationibus Instruxit, by Adolphus Hilgenfeld 1876.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ, καὶ γνῶμεν ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4; PATRES APOSTOLICI, by Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)

GREEK TEXT: “...ἀτενίσωμεν εἰς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ γνῶμεν, ὡς ἔστιν τίμιον τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Chapter 7:4,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Intueamur in sanquine Christi, et cognoscamus quam preclarum sit Patri eius...” - (Chapter 7:4, Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Fixis oculis respiciamus in sanguinem Christi, cernamusque quam pretiosus Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (Chapter 7:4, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Animum intendamus in sanguinem Christi cernamusque quam pretiosus Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (Page 223-224, Chapter 7:4, Latin translation [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866 .)

LATIN TEXT: “...Sanguinem Christi intentis oculis intueamur et cognoscamus, quam pretiosus sit Deo et Patri eios...” - (Page 109, Chapter 7:4; Latin translation PATRES APOSTOLICI, by Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious his blood is in the sight of God...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is unto His Father...” - (George A. Jackson 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious in the sight of God is his blood...” - (Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious His blood is in the sight of God...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is unto His Father...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us look steadfastly to the blood of Christ, and see how precious that blood is to God...” - ( Roberts & Donaldson.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ, and let us know that it is precious to his Father...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ, and let us learn how precious it is unto his Father ...” - (An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our gaze upon the Blood of Christ and understand how precious it is to the Father...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our gaze on the blood of Christ and realize how precious it is to his Father...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us look to the blood of Christ, which is precious to His Father...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and understand how precious it is to his Father...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...We should gaze intently on the blood of Christ and realize how precious it is to his Father...” - (Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us fix our eyes on the blood of Christ and let us realize how precious it is to his Father...” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)

Matt13weedhacker translations:

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to his Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Lake text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to his Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, MPG(A) Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should see [with our minds], that it is highly precious to God, his blood...” - (Chapter 7:4, MPG(B) Text, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should see [with our minds], as it is highly precious to God, his blood...” - (Chapter 7:4, MPG(B) Text, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to his God and Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Lightfoot Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to God his Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Hilgenfeld Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to his God and Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Funk Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should focus our minds intently on the blood of the Christ, even that we should realize that it is highly precious to his Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Lake Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...We should contemplate with wonder the blood of the Christ, and learn to appreciate that it is precious to his Father...” - (Chapter 7:4, Morin Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us transfix our eyes to gaze intently upon the blood of Christ, to understand that it is of great value to his God...” - (Chapter 7:4, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let our eyes be tranfixed, gazing intently upon the blood of Christ, to comprehend how dear the blood of his [= Son] is to God...” - (Chapter 7:4, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let our eyes be tranfixed, gazing intently upon the blood of Christ, [in order] to understand how dear to God it is, his [= Christ's] blood...” - (Chapter 7:4, Rufinus Ltn, Rendering C, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

Again, lets focus in on the most important phrase:


CHAPTER 7:4(B)


...τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
...τῷ Θεῷ [αἷμα] αὐτοῦ...- ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
...τῷ Θεῷ [καὶ Πατρ]ὶ{*} αὐτοῦ...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)
...τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Adolphus Hilgenfeld 1876.)
...τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)
...sit Patri eius...” - (G. Morin 1894.)
...Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (EX VERSIONE RUFINI)
...Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
...sit Deo et Patri eios...” - (Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)

...in the sight of God...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)
...unto His Father...” - (George A. Jackson 1882.)
...in the sight of God...” - (Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)
...is in the sight of God...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)
“...unto His Father...”
- (J.B. Lightfoot.)
...to God...” - (Roberts & Donaldson.)
...to his Father...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)
...unto his Father...” - (An English Translation.)
“...to the Father...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST
...to his Father...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
...to His Father...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)
...to his Father...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)
...to his Father...” - (Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
...to his Father...” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)

Matt13weedhacker translations:

...to his Father...” - (Lake text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his Father...” - (MPG(A) Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God, his blood...” - (MPG(B) Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God, his blood...” - (MPG(B) Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his God and Father...” - (Lightfoot Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God his Father...” - (Hilgenfeld Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his God and Father...” - (Funk Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his Father...” - (Lake Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his Father...” - (Morin Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his God...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...the blood of his [= Son] is to God...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God it is, his [= Christ's] blood...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)


CHAPTER 7:5


GREEK TEXT: “...∆ιέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας καὶ καταμάθωμεν, ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ' αὐτόν...” - ([Chapter 7:1-7] ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...διέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας, καὶ καταμάθωμεν ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ’ αὐτόν...” - (Chapter ,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Διέλθωμεν εἰς τὰς γενεὰς πάσας καὶ καταμάθωμεν, ὅτι ἐν γενεᾷ καὶ γενεᾷ μετανοίας τόπον ἔδωκεν ὁ δεσπότης τοῖς βουλομένοις ἐπιστραφῆναι ἐπ’ αὐτόν...” - (Chapter , “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” Clemens Romanus (Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους) Epistula i ad Corinthios, ed. A. Jaubert, Clément de Rome. Épìtre aux Corinthiens // Sources chrétiennes 167. Paris: Cerf, 1971, 98–204.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Ueniamus ad omina secula, et consideremus quia in secula poenitenciae dedit locum Dominus uolentibus conuerti ad eum...” - (Chapter , Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Intueamur diligenter omnes mundi aetates, discamusque quod in singulis aetatibus, poenitentiae locum Dominus dedit volentibus ad ipsam [ipsum] converti....” - (Chapter 7:1-7, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and learn from age to age the LORD hath given place for repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” by Temple Chevallier, edited by W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn how from generation to generation the Master hath given a place for repentance
unto them that desire to turn to Him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” By George A. Jackson. The Apostolic fathers ; and, The Fathers of the third century. 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us go back to all generations, and learn that in every generation God hath granted a place for repentance to such as wished to return unto him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS translated by Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and let us learn that our Lord has in every one of them still given place for repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, Ancient & Modern Library of Theological Literature by Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn how from generation to generation the Master hath given a place for repentance
unto them that desire to turn to Him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS Translated by J.B. Lightfoot.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Let us turn to every age that has passed, and learn that, from generation to generation, the Lord has granted a place of repentance to all who would be converted to Him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “The First Epistle Of Clement To The Corinthians,” Translated by John Keith. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 9. Edited by Allan Menzies. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1896.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and let us learn that in generation after generation the master has given a place of repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and observe how in each succesive generation the Master has given a place for repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us pass in review all the generations and learn the lesson, that from generation to generation the Master has given an opportunity for conversion to those who were willing to turn to Him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” THE EPISTLES OF. ST. CLEMENT OF ROME AND ST. IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH NEWLY TRANSLATED AND ANNOTATED BY JAMES A. KLEIST, S.J., Ph.D. Professor of Classical Languages St. Louis University St. Louis, Mo. THE NEWMAN BOOKSHOP WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and learn that from generation to genreration the Lord has given an opertunity of repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE FATHERS OF THE CHURCH, A New Translation Vol. 1, Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
http://www.scribd.com/doc/53598582/The-Fathers-of-the-Church-A-new-translation-Volume-01

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us go through every generation and observe that, from generation to generation, the Master has granted a place of repentance to those who would turn to Him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us review all the generations in turn, and learn that from generation to generation the Master has given an opportunity for repentance to those who desire to turn to him...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Michael Holmes 3rd edition 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Let us review all the generations and learn that from one to the next the Master has provided opportunity for repentence...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers: I Clement, II Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Didache,” By Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=7nPPmqAu4RwC&printsec=frontcover&dq=the+apostolic+fathers&hl=en&ei=cN9ATZHDD4L3gAecmZjfAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false&safe=high

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...that from one genreation to another the Master “has afforded opertunity of repentance...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers, the Moody Classics 2009.)


CHAPTER 7:7(A)


GREEK TEXT: “...Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - ([Chapter 7:1-7] ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καιπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter ,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...Ἰωνᾶς Νινευΐταις καταστροφὴν ἐκήρυξεν· οἱ δὲ μετανοήσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν ἐξιλάσαντο τὸν Θεὸν ἱκετεύσαντες καὶ ἔλαβον σωτηρίαν, καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter , “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” Clemens Romanus (Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους) Epistula i ad Corinthios, ed. A. Jaubert, Clément de Rome. Épìtre aux Corinthiens // Sources chrétiennes 167. Paris: Cerf, 1971, 98–204.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Ionas Niniuitis predicauit euersionem ; et quia poenitentiam egerunt propter peccata sua, exorauerunt Deum deprecantes, et acceperunt salutem, quamuis erant alieni Deo...” - (Chapter , Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...Jonas Ninivitis urbis subversionem praedicavit ; illi autem de peccatis suis acta poenitentia, Deum precibus placarunt, et salutem conecuti sunt, licet alieni a Deo essent...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...appeased the wrath of God by their prayers ; and received salvation although they were strangers (to the covenant) of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” by Temple Chevallier, edited by W. R. Whittingham 1834.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Jonah preached destruction unto the men of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, obtained pardon of God by their supplications and received salvation, albeit they were aliens from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” By George A. Jackson. The Apostolic fathers ; and, The Fathers of the third century. 1882.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Jonah prophesied destruction to the Ninevites, and they, repenting of their sins, appeased God through prayer, and, though alien from God, obtained salvation...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS translated by Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...howbeit they, repenting of their sins, appeased God by their prayers, and were saved, though they were strangers to the covenant of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, Ancient & Modern Library of Theological Literature by Dr. Burton 1888.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Jonah preached destruction unto the men of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, obtained pardon of God by their supplications and received salvation, albeit they were aliens from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7; THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS Translated by J.B. Lightfoot.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites; but they, repenting of their sins, propitiated God by prayer, and obtained salvation, although they were aliens [to the covenant] of God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “The First Epistle Of Clement To The Corinthians,” Translated by John Keith. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 9. Edited by Allan Menzies. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1896.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...they received forgiveness of their sins from God in answer to prayer, and gained salvation, though they were aliens to God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, Krissop Lake 1912.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.): “...and they repented of their sins, and propitiated God with their supplications and were saved, aliens though they were from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” An English Translation.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Jonas announced destruction to the Ninevites: they did penance for their sins and by their prayers propitiated God and gained salvation, although they were not of God’s own people...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” THE EPISTLES OF. ST. CLEMENT OF ROME AND ST. IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH NEWLY TRANSLATED AND ANNOTATED BY JAMES A. KLEIST, S.J., Ph.D. Professor of Classical Languages St. Louis University St. Louis, Mo. THE NEWMAN BOOKSHOP WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND 1946.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and they repented of their sins, besought God in prayer and, estranged though they were from God, obtained salvation...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” THE FATHERS OF THE CHURCH, A New Translation Vol. 1, Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
http://www.scribd.com/doc/53598582/The-Fathers-of-the-Church-A-new-translation-Volume-01

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Jonah preached destruction to the Ninevites, but they, having repented of their sins, appeased God by supplication, and received salvation, even though they were foreigners to God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Kevin P. Edgecomb.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...Jonah preacheddestruction to the people of Nineveh; but they, repenting of their sins, made atonement to God by their prayers and received salvation, even though they were alienated from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” translated by Michael Holmes 3rd edition 2003.)

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and those who repented of their sins appeased God through their fervent pleas and received salvation, even though they had been estranged from God...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers: I Clement, II Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Didache,” By Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=7nPPmqAu4RwC&printsec=frontcover&dq=the+apostolic+fathers&hl=en&ei=cN9ATZHDD4L3gAecmZjfAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false&safe=high

CLEMENT OF ROME (circa. 30-100 C.E.):...and when they had repented of their sins, they propitiated God with their prayers and gained salvation despite the fact they were not God's people...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, “1st Epistle to the Corinthians, by Clement of Rome,” The Apostolic Fathers, the Moody Classics 2009.)


...appeased the wrath of God by their prayers ; and received salvation although they were strangers (to the covenant) of God...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)
...of God by their supplications and received salvation...” - (George A. Jackson 1882.)
...appeased God through prayer, [...] obtained salvation...” - (Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)
...appeased God by their prayers, and were saved...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)
...of God by their supplications and received salvation...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)
...propitiated God by prayer, and obtained salvation...” - (Roberts & Donaldson.)
...from God in answer to prayer, and gained salvation...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)
...propitiated God with their supplications and were saved...” - (An English Translation.)
...by their prayers propitiated God and gained salvation...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST 1946.)
...besought God in prayer [...] obtained salvation...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
...appeased God by supplication, and received salvation...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)
...made atonement to God by their prayers and received salvation...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)
...appeased God through their fervent pleas and received salvation...” - (Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
...they propitiated God with their prayers and gained salvation...” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)


CHAPTER 7:7(B)



GREEK TEXT: “...καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - ([Chapter 7:1-7] ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙΟΝ Ζ’. Epistula i ad Corinthios Τοῦ ἁγίου Κλήμεντος τοῦ Ῥώμης ἐπισκόπου ἐπιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους Α ’. Ἐκ προσώπου τῆς Ῥωμαίων Ἐκκλησίας γραφεῖσα, [MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's Patrologia Graeca (Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca) Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

GREEK TEXT: “...καιπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter ,1st Epistle to the Corinthians, [ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Α] by Clement of Rome,” THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, I CLEMENT, II CLEMENT Based on the Krissop Lake text of the Loeb Classical Library First published 1913.)

GREEK TEXT: “...καίπερ ἀλλότριοι τοῦ Θεοῦ ὄντες...” - (Chapter , “1st Epistle to the Corinthians,” Clemens Romanus (Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους) Epistula i ad Corinthios, ed. A. Jaubert, Clément de Rome. Épìtre aux Corinthiens // Sources chrétiennes 167. Paris: Cerf, 1971, 98–204.)

LATIN TEXT: “...quamuis erant alieni Deo...” - (Chapter , Latin translation circa 2nd-3rd Century C.E., preserved in 11th Century C.E., MSS G. Morin Sancti Clementis Romani ad Corinthios Epistulae version latina antiquissima, Anecdota Maredsolana 2 ; Maredsosus, Belgium, 1894.)

LATIN TEXT: “...licet alieni a Deo essent...” - (Chapter 7:1-7, AD CORINTHIOS EPISTOLA PRIMA. SANCTI CLEMENTIS EPISCOPI ROMANI, ( EX VERSIONE RUFINI ) Tomus Primus [Book I], Patres Apostolici, COLLECTIO SELECTA SS. ECCLESIAE PATRUM, Complectens Exquisitissima Opera. By D. M. N. S. Guuillon. M. DCCC. XXIX.)

...although they were strangers (to the covenant) of God...” - (W. R. Whittingham 1834.)
...albeit they were aliens from God...” - (George A. Jackson 1882.)
...though alien from God...” - (Charles H. Hoole, 1885.)
...though they were strangers to the covenant of God...” - (Dr. Burton 1888.)
...albeit they were aliens from God...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)
...although they were aliens [to the covenant] of God...” - (Roberts & Donaldson.)
...though they were aliens to God...” - (Krissop Lake 1912.)
...aliens though they were from God...” - (An English Translation.)
...although they were not of God’s own people...” - (JAMES A. KLEIST 1946.)
...estranged though they were from God...” - (Ludwig Schopp 1962.)
...even though they were foreigners to God...” - (Kevin P. Edgecomb.)
...even though they were alienated from God...” - (Michael Holmes 2003.)
...even though they had been estranged from God...” - (Bart D. Ehrman 2003.)
...despite the fact they were not God's people...” - (the Moody Classics 2009.)


SUMMARY:


It appears from my point of view that Clement in verse 3, when he speaks of:

GREEK TEXT: “...τοῦ ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς...” - ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
LATIN TEXT: “...Deo qui fecit nos...” - (G. Morin 1894.)
LATIN TEXT: “...eo qui fecit nos....” - (EX VERSIONE RUFINI)

...the One Who made us...” - (MPG Text, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...God himself, Who made us...” - (Morin Ltn, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...Him Who has made us...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Rendering C, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

That Clement is equating or refering to the same person in verse 4, as:

...τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
...τῷ Θεῷ [αἷμα] αὐτοῦ...- ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's)
...τῷ Θεῷ [καὶ Πατρ]ὶ{*} αὐτοῦ...” - (J.B. Lightfoot.)
...τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Adolphus Hilgenfeld 1876.)
...τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ...” - (Franciscus Xaverius Funk 1901.)
...sit Patri eius...” - (G. Morin 1894.)
...Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (EX VERSIONE RUFINI)

...his Father...” - (MPG(A) Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God...” - (MPG(B) Text, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to his God and Father...” - (Lightfoot Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God his Father...” - (Hilgenfeld Text, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...his Father...” - (Morin Ltn, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...his God...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Rendering A, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)
...to God...” - (Rufinus Ltn, Rendering B, Matt13weedhacker 1/07/12)

There are variations here in the Manuscripts as can be seen by the differneces in the Critical texts quoted above. They are, to the extant that I can acertain, as follows:

( A ) = Gk., ( τῷ Θεῷ [καὶ Πατρ]ὶ αὐτοῦ ) “...to-the God and Father of-him...”

( K1, L, S ) = Gk., ( τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ ) “...to-the Father of-him...”

( C / H ) = Gk., ( τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ τῷ Θεῷ ) “...to-the Father of-him to-the God...”

( K2 ) = Gk., ( τῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ τῷ Θεῷ ) “...to-the Father of-him to-the God...”

( A ) = Codex Alexandrinus (circa. 5-6th C.E.)
( C / H ) = Codex Constantinopolitanus/Hierosolymitanus (circa. 11th C.E.)
( L ) = Codex Florinensis, Morin Latin version (circa. 2-3rd C.E. text in 11th C.E. MSS.)
( S ) = Codex Cantabrigiensis, Syriac version (circa. 8th C.E. text in 11th C.E. MSS.)
( K1 / Kb) = Berlin Codex, Coptic version (circa. 4th C.E.)
( K2 / Ks ) = Strausberg Codex, Coptic version (circa. 7th C.E.)

LINK TO THE GREEK TEXT OF THE CODEX ALEXANDRINUS = See the link below, lines 5 and 6 for Chapter 7:4:

LINK TO COPTIC TEXT OF THE BERLIN CODEX = Chapter 7:4 = Page 40, Line 10:

LINK TO COPTIC TEXT OF THE STRAUSBURG CODEX = Chapter 7:4 = Page 23-24, Line 4:

LINK TO THE GREEK TEXT OF THE CODEX CONSTANTINOPOLITANUS = See the link below for the beginning of 1st Clement, flip pages to find Chapter 7:4:

The critical texts of recent centuries are as above.

It appears that, regardless of these variants, that the Father is indeed in view.

But what about the "...BLOOD..." variant's?

GREEK TEXT:...τῷ Θεῷ [αἷμα] αὐτοῦ...- ([MPG] Jacques Paul Migne's) ?
LATIN TEXT:...Deo sit ejus sanguis...” - (EX VERSIONE RUFINI) ?

The Greek conjectural reading of Migne, Gk., ( αἷμα ) “...blood...” or Rufinus' Ltn., ( snaguis ) must be rejected for the following reasons.

  1. The gap in the Codex Alexandrinus is to wide for it to be this single word according to Lightfoot.
  2. The other reading is a more Biblical one and more likely to be original.
  3. None of the other Language versions, i.e., the Syriac, Coptic, the Old Latin (Morin), or Greek in the Codex Constantinopolitanus have blood a second time in the text.
  4. Rufinus was a notorious corrupter of the ANF writings in favor of, (and under pressure at the threat of death), the newly established, and enforced, Post-Chanceldon “Orthodoxy” of his time. And therefore cannot be trusted.

All of which are good reasons.

So, as was said before, it is indeed the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, that Clement has in view.

He is the God of Jesus Christ:

Gk., ( τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ ) Lit., “...to-the God and Father of-him...”

Gk., ( τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ ) “...his God and Father...”

This is actually a well known Biblical phrase. In fact the identical Greek is found at Revelation 1:6:

ΑΠΟΚΑΛΥΨΙΣ ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ 1:6 Greek NT: Westcott/Hort with Diacritics
“...καὶ ἐποίησεν ἡμᾶς βασιλείαν, ἱερεῖς τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ, αὐτῷ ἡ δόξα καὶ τὸ κράτος εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν...”

Young's Literal Translation
“...and did make us kings and priests -- ( to his ) -- ( God ) -- and Father, to him is the glory and the power to the ages of the ages! Amen...”

Gk., ( τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ ) Lit., “...to-the God and Father of-him...”

Compare other similar Biblical phrases, such as the one found at 1st Peter 1:3:

ΠΕΤΡΟΥ Α΄ 1:3 Greek NT: Westcott/Hort with Diacritics
“...Εὐλογητὸς ὁ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ κατὰ τὸ πολὺ αὐτοῦ ἔλεος ἀναγεννήσας ἡμᾶς εἰς ἐλπίδα ζῶσαν δι’ ἀναστάσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐκ νεκρῶν...”

Young's Literal Translation
“...Blessed is the God and Father -- ( of ) -- our Lord Jesus Christ, who, according to the abundance of His kindness did beget us again to a living hope, through the rising again of Jesus Christ out of the dead...”

And 2nd Corinthians 1:3:

ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ Β΄ 1:3 Greek NT: Westcott/Hort with Diacritics
“...
Εὐλογητὸς ὁ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ Πατὴρ τῶν οἰκτιρμῶν καὶ Θεὸς πάσης παρακλήσεως...”

International Standard Version (©2008)
“...Blessed be the God and Father -- ( of ) -- our Lord Jesus, the Messiah! He is our merciful Father and the God of all comfort...”

And Ephesians 1:17:

ΠΡΟΣ ΕΦΕΣΙΟΥΣ 1:17 Greek NT: Westcott/Hort with Diacritics
“...ἵνα ὁ Θεὸς τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ Πατὴρ τῆς δόξης, δώῃ ὑμῖν πνεῦμα σοφίας καὶ ἀποκαλύψεως ἐν ἐπιγνώσει αὐτοῦ...”

Young's Literal Translation
“...that -- ( the God ) -- ( of ) -- our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of the glory, may give to you a spirit of wisdom and revelation in the recognition of him...”

Also compare his close comtemporaries who spoke of Jesus Father in a similar way. 

For instance Ignatius of Antioch in the Long Recension:

LATIN TEXT: “...Glorifico Deum, et Patrem Domini nostri Jesu Christi...” - (Chapter 1:1, The Epistle to the Smyrnaeans, Page 104, “Corpus Ignatianum, a Complete Collection of the Ignatian Epistles, genuine, interpolated and spurious,” by William Cureton 1849.)

GREEK TEXT: “...∆οξάζω τὸν Θεὸν καὶ Πατέρα τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ...” - (Chapter 1:1, MPG, Jacques Paul Migne's “Patrologia Graeca,” or “Patrologiae Cursus Completus,” Series Graeca, Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH (circa. 30-117 C.E.): “...I GLORIFY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 1:1, The Epistle to the Smyrnaeans, Page 305, “Primitive Christianity Revived,” Vol., 4, By William Whiston )

IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH (circa. 30-117 C.E.): “...I GLORIFY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 1:1, “The Epistle to the Smyrnaeans,” Translated by Alexander Roberts and James Donaldson. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 1. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1885.)

Also Polcarp of Smyrna:

LATIN TEXT: “...Deus autem et Pater Domini nostri Iesu Christi...” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, MPG, Jacques Paul Migne's “Patrologia Graeca,” or “Patrologiae Cursus Completus,” Series Graeca, Imprimerie Catholique, 1857–1866.)

RECONSTRUCTED GREEK TEXT: “...ὁ δἐ Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ...” - (Chapter 12:2; Pages 344-346, THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS PART II. S. IGNATIUS, S. POLCARP, Revised Texts with Introductions, Notes, Dissertations, and Translations by J. B. Lightfoot, Second Edition 1889.)

The literal reading of the Latin text is:

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...THE GOD -- ( OF ) -- HIM AND/EVEN{*} FATHER ( OF ) LORD ( OF ) OURS JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, Matt13weedhacker 10/5/11)
[FOOTNOTE *]: A back slash / is to indicate possible different meanings of the same word

I would render it alternatively:

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...MAY -- ( HIS ) -- ( GOD ), -- EVEN THE FATHER OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, Matt13weedhacker 5/7/12)

The Greek text reads this way:

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST HIMSELF...” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, Matt13weedhacker 5/7/12)

Other translators old and new:

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST…” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, Page 577, Chapter II. The Antiquities of the Christian Church, Part 1, By Joseph Bingham reprinted 2005.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST, AND JESUS CHRIST HIMSELF…” - (Chapter 12:2; Epistle to the Phillipians, Page 577, Chapter II. The Antiquities of the Christian Church, Part 1, By Joseph Bingham reprinted 2005.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; Page 330. Polycarp Phil. [As quoted in William Whistons 'Primitive Christianity Revived' Vol., 4.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; The Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians in APOSTOLIC FATHERS as translated by J.B. LIGHTFOOT.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...BUT MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST, AND JESUS CHRIST HIMSELF...” - (Chapter 12:2; Translated by Alexander Roberts and James Donaldson. From Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 1. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1885.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; Letter to the Philippians. Translation By Archbishop Wake, Revised edition)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST..." - (Chapter 12:2; Polycarps Epistle to the Phillipians Pages 149-150, Vol 1, “Apostolicity of Trinitarianism” Translated by George Stanley Faber 1832.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST..." - (Chapter 12:2; “Epistle to the Phillipians” in “Translation of the epistles of Clement of Rome, Polycarp and Ignatius, and of the apologies of Justin Martyr and Tertullian,” Translated by Temple Chevallier 1851.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; Page 136, The Letter of Polycarp to the Philippians Sparks, Jack N., editor. THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS. Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1978.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...NOW MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; The Letter of Polycarp to the Philippians The Apostolic Fathers Greek Texts and English Translations, 3rd ed. Michael W. Holmes 2007.)

POLCARP OF SMYRNA (circa. 65-155 C.E.): “...SO MAY ( THE GOD ) AND FATHER -- ( OF ) -- OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST...” - (Chapter 12:2; The Epistle of Polycarp to the Phillipians Page 349-350, LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY. “THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS” Vol 1. Edited and Translated by BART D. EHRMAN 2003.)


CONCLUSION:


In view of the above, it is logical to conclude that the Father is to be considered the same person referred to throughout all of Chapter 7 as:

1.) Verse 3, Gk., ( τοῦ Ποιήσαντος ἡμᾶς ) “...the One Who made us...”
2.) Verse 4, Ltn., ( τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ ) “...the God and Father of him...”
3.) Verse 5, Gk., ( ὁ Δεσπότης ) “...the Soveriegn Lord...”
4.) Verse 7(B), Gk., ( τὸν Θεὸν ) “...the God...”
5.) Verse 7(C), Gk., ( τοῦ Θεοῦ ) “...the God...”

There is no Tri{3}nity doctrine here in chapter 7 of Clement, in any way whatsoever.